wailing wall

Trek to the Water

I have been away from blogging for a long period of time and I have not kept in touch with all my blog friends, mainly due to internet unavailability and also a brief illness on my last trek.  However, I am back here among a great group of friends who write, read, make comments, and give valuable feedback and much needed support!

Once in a while, nostalgic memories assail us all, and images of childhood life and adventures flash across our minds.  Mine started at the beach and resulted in my latest trek.

Each summer I spend a week at a beach house with my very young grandkids.  We make daily treks to the beach where they happily play in the sand, but staunchly refuse to go into the water.  Last summer, we occupied a house with a swimming pool, and of course they refused to set foot in the pool.

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My young grandkids made me realize, as many of you do, the importance of teaching children to swim.  Each time I see kids close to water, my mind flashes back to my childhood, and I relive a vague, yet poignant memory of my two-year old brother gasping for breath and sinking in a stream.

Although I cannot recall everything that transpired, apparently my frantic screams alerted a neighbor, who jumped in the stream and rescued him from drowning.  Many children are not so lucky.   According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), approximately 10 people drown every day in the U.S., and more than one in five are children under fourteen years of age.

My blogging friends, if any of you have young children, can they swim?  If not, I urge you to seriously consider swimming lessons.

After that incident, many of the neighborhood kids learned to swim in that same stream. I actually learned by holding on to a banana sucker (the trunk of a banana tree), and kicking my way around. Some kids used a bucket, grabbing on to the sides and kicking, while trying to avoid getting water in the bucket.  Our young lives revolved around that stream, and we shared many adventures, including fishing, rafting, and water sports.

It is hardly any wonder that on my trek to the beach with my grandkids, I had the nostalgic urge to make a trek to my childhood watery playground. In case if you are wondering if my grandkids ventured into the pool…I was successful in coaxing them into the water, and commenced their swimming lessons!

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I would like to hear your stories on your children and grandchildren and how they learnt to swim.  Were they afraid of the water?

 

michael-phelps_883x1200Here is an excerpt of the bio of a famous swimmer. Do you know him?  Michael Phelps’ performances at the 2004 and 2008 Olympics have brought him strong consideration as the greatest ever Olympian. He has surpassed the records of Mark Spitz and Johnny Weissmuller and is considered the greatest swimmer ever.  At the Beijing Olympics, Phelps won eight swimming events and became the first Olympian to win eight gold medals at one Olympic Games.

Are there any future Olympians out there?

 

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My quest for the Lost City of Aelia Capitolina.

Twenty years ago, a fellow college student showed me a Roman coin stamped with the head of the emperor Hadrian.    The coin was dated around 130 AD, during the time when the Romans occupied Jerusalem.  hadrian coinIt is common knowledge that the Romans sacked Jerusalem in 10 AD, leveling the city to rubble.  However, many people including myself were unaware that Hadrian later built a beautiful Roman city over the ruins during the period 130 – 140 AD.  He named the city Aelia Capitolina, and it was laid out with beautiful marble roads, pillars, shops, large villas, roman baths, swimming pools, cisterns fed by an aqueduct, massive engraved gates, and a temple dedicated to the worship of Jupiter.

This beautiful city aroused my interest, and finding the city of Aelia Capitolina became my quest!

A few months later, I arrived in the old city of Jerusalem and was greeted by a labyrinth of winding alleyways, narrow streets, aged buildings, churches, and market bazaars surrounded by an atmosphere of frenetic energy.

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Goats and a donkey creating traffic nightmare

The city was surrounded by very high ramparts, but I found a winding staircase that took me to the top of the massive walls where I walked around for about an hour, enjoying a bird’s eye view of the city.  I saw courtyards, housetops, steeples, minarets, domes, but virtually no evidence of any ancient Roman city.

Subsequent Muslim, Christian, and Jewish rule over the years had obliterated the Roman presence and instilled a kasbah flavor to the city.

Aelia Capitolina had vanished or so it seemed.  My inquiries led me to the Institute of Archaeology in Tel Aviv where I met an interesting and intriguing contact.  He showed up at 5 A.M. on a cold, misty morning at my hotel door, hurriedly bundled me into a waiting car, and drove to the Jewish Quarter without any explanation.  We entered an archway close to the western wall (wailing wall) into a dark tunnel lit by a single, naked, dangling light bulb.  On one side of the tunnel wall there was a small door guarded by two heavily armed soldiers. The guards opened the door and hustled us into a small room, locking us inside. I remember glancing up at the dim light bulb and frantically wondering if I was being brought into an interrogation room.

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My nervousness dissipated when I saw a few smiling faces, and I was given a yarmulke to wear.  I was told we were going into sacred ground, and my excitement mounted when I saw a small elevator shaft, and a lift supported by chains and pulleys. I realized I was being taken down into my first archaeological dig!

The lift took us slowly down the deep, narrow shaft and came to rest into a large room with an ornate marbled floor.  I was elated!  We were in the living room of some wealthy Roman in the lost city of Aelia Capitolina!  The room was in remarkable shape, with perfectly formed pillars, decorated walls, mosaic tiles and a fireplace.  We stepped outside the room into a corridor that led to a marbled street, flanked on both sides by well preserved stone columns.   The large paving stones on the street were in perfect condition, and led to an arched bridge with the remnants of shops on both sides.  I toured the excavated portions of the underground city excitedly, amazed by the longevity of the solid stone structures.  The public baths and drinking water reservoir were in very good condition, filled with water from some hidden aqueduct or seeping rainfall.  Excavation of Aelia Capitolina was still in progress, but viewing the underground city was a novel experience for me.  My quest had been fulfilled!world photo shots

Today, excavation is still continuing, and a portion has been exposed and made visible to the public. Visitors to Jerusalem can now stroll down part of a Roman street in Aelia Capitolina.

Interestingly, I came across an article in the Israeli Haaretz newspaper written a year ago on Aelia Capitolina. This is an excerpt from the article: “Following the latest wave of excavations, which began in the mid-1990s, more and more archaeologists have become convinced that Aelia Capitolina was a much larger and more important city than was once thought, and its influence on the later development of modern Jerusalem was dramatic”.

I am happy to think that I was convinced of that when I decided on my trek 🙂

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Categories: adventure travel, aelia capitolina, author, foreign travel, global, jerusalem, kasbah, lifestyle, novel, photography, roman cities, travel, trekking, Uncategorized, united nations, wailing wall, world, writer, writing | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 37 Comments

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